Review: Tainted Blood by M. L. Brennan

tainted-bloodTainted Blood
by M. L. Brennan
Series: Generation V #3
Genre: Urban Fantasy
Published by Roc, 2014
E-book, purchased
318 pages
Grade: B+
Synopsis: In the third Generation V novel, Fortitude Scott proves that working with family can be deadly…

Former film student Fortitude Scott is finally gainfully employed. Unfortunately, said employment happens to be with a group of sociopathic vampires—his family. And as much as Fort is loath to get too deep into the family business, when his brother, Chivalry, is temporarily unable to run the territory, it’s up to Fort to keep things under control.

So when the leader of a powerful faction of shifters turns up murdered, Fort finds himself tracking down a killer while navigating dangerous rivalries, longtime grudges, and hidden agendas. Even with the help of his foxy kitsune sidekick, Suzume, he’ll need to pull out all the stops to hunt for the paranormal assassin.

But as he calls on fairies, witches, and ghouls for help, he discovers that the problem is much bigger than a single dead werebear. The supernatural community is preparing for a massive shift in power within the Scott family leadership—and Fort has landed right in the middle of the gathering storm.…

From the expression on Sassoon’s face, he not only caught the reference, but was highly offended by it. Again, Suzume’s instincts for antagonization were proving flawless.

and

The situation should’ve been annoyingly reminiscent of a sultan checking out new applicants for the harem, but instead it reminded me very uncomfortably of Discovery Channel footage of a wolf inspecting a deer herd.

Cheers

  • Each book gets better and better.
  • We get lots of Suzume in this book and I love that.
  • We learn more about vampires in this book.
  • These books have a mystery in them, but the paranormal aspects of the book are more important than the mystery.
  • Even the recurring and secondary characters in the book are complex and interesting–Suzume, Prudence, Chivalry. All have motivations for the way they act even Prudence who is very scary and even Chivalry who seems like a “civilized” vampire who loves his wives, but nevertheless slowly kills them.
  • Fort learns more about how vampires live and is appalled by what he learns.
  • The book is often very funny.

Jeers

  • I had an idea who the murderer was, but important details were missing until the last minute. In a mystery that would have irritated me, but as I said above these books aren’t mysteries first and foremost. I did think that someone would have mentioned some of the important facts earlier in the investigation.

And a few thoughts . . .

  • I’m so ready for the next book in the series. It should come out in August 2015.

Have you read this book? How did you like it?

  • 2014 Goodreads Challenge

Review: John Golden: Freelance Debugger by Django Wexler

john-golden

 

John Golden: Freelance Debugger
by Django Wexler
Series: John Golden, Book 1
Genre:  Urban Fantasy
Published by Ragnorak Publications, 2014
E-book, Purchased
62 pages
Grade: B
Synopsis: John Golden is a debugger: he goes inside the computer systems of his corporate clients to exterminate the gremlins, sprites, and other fairies that take up residence. But when he gets a frantic call from Serpentine Systems, a top-of-the-line anti-fairy security company, John finds out he’s on much more than a simple smurf-punting expedition.

 

I found a socket and plugged Sarah into it, leaving her leaning against the wall[12].

[12] Seattle power: fruity and piquant, with the hint of citrus that comes from a dash of hydroelectricity. Not as subtle as San Francisco, but quite palatable. —

and

As I’d told Delphi, a fairy burrow is a kind of extended metaphor, a story telling and retelling itself through the medium of bits and pieces of computing time. From the outside, with a connection to the underlying system, Sarah can push or pull in certain ways.

Cheers

  • Such a different urban fantasy.
  • This fantasy gives a whole new spin to debugging!
  • A fun book to read. I didn’t like that it was so short, but that also made it a good, quick read!
  • An irreverent and breezy writing style.
  • John Golden is good at his job, but also kind of a lovable flake! He hides his expertise behind his wisecracking exterior.
  • Sarah is John’s sister and his assistant. John explains in this story that her soul is a computer program in a Dell Inspirion computer. Wow! She helps John with his debugging work.
  • In the Kindle edition of this book Sarah makes mocking and tongue-in-cheek comments via footnotes (at the end of a paragraph) about the things John does. (See the quote above for an example.)

Jeers

  • It’s too short! I wanted more.

And a few thoughts . . .

The second novella in this series–John Golden and the Heroes of Mazaroth–was published in August.

Have you read this book? How did you like it?