Sunday Post: July 31

Sunday-Post

This is a great meme to take part in every week and I thank Kimba for hosting it!

I like this meme because it gives me an opportunity to take a look back at last week and forward to next week in both my personal life and my blog and book life! I also like to see what other people are doing and what books everyone is reading.

Last week–home and blog

It cooled off a little this last week–not as hot or humid. Yay!

Eastern Iowa

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We spent the last week in eastern Iowa with my husband’s father. He had doctors’ appointments my husband took him to and we had a good time visiting with him as well as other family members.

The town has a summer theater which we try to go to when we get a chance. They did a production of Grease and that was fun to see. My husband and I got a few chances to go for coffee and take a few pictures, too.

And now we’re back home.

Television

The only thing I got to watch was the Democratic Convention. However, we have our TV programs recorded so we can watch them now we’re back home.

The blog

I’m finally getting back on track with my blog and reading. That makes me happy.

Blog posts

My books

What I’m reading
  • Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire
  • The Brutal Telling by Louise Penny
What I read last week
  • A Killing at Cotton Hill by Terry Shames
  • In the Land of Milk and Honey by Jane Jensen
New–Books, E-books, NetGalley, Audiobooks–purchased or free or from library

The Edge of Worlds by Martha Wells

Tesser: Dragons Among Us by Chris Philbrook

Dark Matter by Blake Crouch

Dark Run by Mark Brooks

Kingdom Come by Jane Jensen

Interesting on the internet

Free Sync Audio books

Sync is back again for the summer (May 5 – Aug 17). Sync is a program which provides two free young adult audiobook downloads each week. Each set of books are only available for one week.

Only 3 more weeks of Sync books!

The Sync books available next week (July 28 – August 4):

  • Pennies for Hitler by Jackie French; read by Humphrey Bower
  • Juba! by Walter Dean Myers; read by Brandon Myer

The Sync books available this week (August 4 – 11):

  • Most Dangerous: Daniel Ellsberg and the Secret History of the Vietnam War by Steve Sheinkin; read by Ray Porter
  • The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henriquez; read by Yareli Arizmendi, Christine Avila, Jesse Corti, Gustavo Res, Ozzie Rodriguez, Gabriel Romero

To listen to these books you must download Overdrive Media Console. It is available free to download at the Sync site.

Note: Some of the books have international restrictions, but some are available even if you live outside the U.S.

Next Week–home & blog

We are home the first part of this week and then we’re headed to northern Wisconsin for a family reunion. There will be lots of activities and we’re celebrating one of our patriarch’s 90th birthday.

Blog posts

  • August books on my list
  • Top Ten Tuesday
  • Waiting on Wednesday
  • Review: No Good Dragon Goes Unpunished by Rachel Aaron
  • Review
  • Sunday Post

What did you do last week? What books did you collect? What are you planning?

Waiting on Wednesday: July 27

I am participating in Waiting on Wednesday hosted by Breaking the Spine. This gives me a chance to show the books I’m looking forward to in the next few months.

Check out Breaking the Spine for more information.

………………………..

the-masked-cityThe Masked City

by Genevieve Cogman

Series: The Invisible Library #2

Genre: Fantasy

Publication date: September 6

Synopsis: The written word is mightier than the sword—most of the time…
 
Working in an alternate version of Victorian London, Librarian-spy Irene has settled into a routine, collecting important fiction for the mysterious Library and blending in nicely with the local culture. But when her apprentice, Kai—a dragon of royal descent—is kidnapped by the Fae, her carefully crafted undercover operation begins to crumble.

Kai’s abduction could incite a conflict between the forces of chaos and order that would devastate all worlds and all dimensions. To keep humanity from getting caught in the crossfire, Irene will have to team up with a local Fae leader to travel deep into a version of Venice filled with dark magic, strange coincidences, and a perpetual celebration of Carnival—and save her friend before he becomes the first casualty of a catastrophic war.

But navigating the tumultuous landscape of Fae politics will take more than Irene’s book-smarts and fast-talking—to ward off Armageddon, she might have to sacrifice everything she holds dear….

…………………………

The reasons this book appeals to me:
  • I enjoyed the first book in this world.
  • I want to see what happens in this book.
  • I want to find out more about the differences between chaos and order.
  • I also want to find out more about the Library.

What books are you excited about?

Borrowing Death by Cathy Pegau

borrowing-deathBorrowing Death by Cathy Pegau
Series: Charlotte Brody Mystery #2
Genre: Historical Mystery
Setting: Cordova, Alaska Territory, 1919
Published by Kensington
Format: e-Arc (Release Date: June 28, 2016)
–I received a review copy of this book from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. The opinions stated here are entirely my own.
210 pages
Grade: B-
Synopsis: Suffragette and journalist Charlotte Brody is bracing herself for her first winter in the frontier town of Cordova in the Alaska Territory. But the chilling murder of a local store owner is what really makes her blood run cold. . .

After three months in Cordova, Charlotte is getting accustomed to frontier life. She is filing articles for the local paper–including a provocative editorial against Prohibition–and enjoying a reunion with her brother Michael, the town doctor and coroner. Michael’s services are soon called upon when a fire claims the life of hardware store owner Lyle Fiske. A frontier firebug is suspected of arson, but when Michael determines Fiske was stabbed before his store was set ablaze, the town of Cordova has another murder to solve.

Her journalist’s curiosity whetted, Charlotte begins to sort through the smoldering ruins of Lyle Fiske’s life, only to discover any number of people who might have wanted him dead. As the days grow shorter, Charlotte’s investigation turns increasingly complex. She may be distant from the trappings of civilization, but untangling the motives for murder will require plumbing the very depths of Charlotte’s investigative acumen. . .

Initial impressions

I enjoyed this mystery set in the Alaska Territory though I did have a few problems with it.

The story

  • The story continues from the first book with Charlotte living in the Alaska Territory in Cordova.
  • Charlotte works as a journalist for the town newspaper.
  • She’s excited that the 19th Amendment to the Constitution (giving women the right to vote) is being ratified by the states. (Twenty states had ratified the Amendment.)  Charlotte is interested in women’s rights as well as other political issues.
  • The hardware store in town burns down and someone inside the store dies.
  • Charlotte is at the scene of the fire so she can write about it in the town paper.
  • An arsonist has been setting fires around Cordova though nothing as big as this. Did the arsonist set the fire?
  • Charlotte feels she needs to figure out who set the fire.

Pluses

  • I love the time period and the setting in the Alaska Territory.
  • The descriptions about using hot lead to set the type for the newspaper are fascinating.
  • I like that Charlotte writes unpopular articles in the newspaper. An article about the prohibition of alcohol and the harm that could do brings out the angry temperance movement in Cordova.
  • I like the mystery. There are twists and turns and everything and everyone isn’t always happy with the outcome.
  • A beautiful cover–though Charlotte is dressed a little too fancy for the Alaska Territory.

Minuses

  • It would have been better if the members of the temperance movement weren’t stereotypes. There are valid points on both side of the alcohol issue–though prohibition didn’t work.
  • I felt Charlotte trades too much on her friendship with Deputy Marshal Eddington.
  • I’m not sure what happened in book 1, but Eddington doesn’t show himself in the best light in this book.

And concluding thoughts . . .

  • I haven’t read the first book in the series, but was able to enjoy this book. I do think I might have appreciated this book more if I had read the first book.

Have you read this book? How did you like it?

From Cathy Pegau:

  • “Writing was not the career path I chose when the time came. I thought the arts, while enjoyable, was not the way to make a living. So I went into science. Wildlife biology, to be exact. Yep, plenty of prosperous biologists wandering about in the woods, you know. Obviously money was not high on my list of job perks. But I enjoyed the course work (how many college students can say THAT?) and managed to get short-term positions for a few years. It was fun, hard and sweaty work, and gave me the chance to see and do things I wouldn’t have if I had chosen accounting or even writing. Like get lost in the woods overnight. But that’s another story.
  • I got engaged, then married–to a scientist, assuring perpetual financial uncertainty. We lived in Oregon for a while, and when he was offered a job in Alaska we jumped at it. So, now we live here with our kids and critters and the occasional moose strolling through the yard. I can’t afford therapy, so I write. I want to do what I want to do, so I write. I want my kids to know that pursuing dreams is important, so I write.”

Reading Challenges

Sunday Post: July 24

Sunday-Post

This is a great meme to take part in every week and I thank Kimba for hosting it!

I like this meme because it gives me an opportunity to take a look back at last week and forward to next week in both my personal life and my blog and book life! I also like to see what other people are doing and what books everyone is reading.

Last week–home and blog

Sweltering here in the Midwest! With the humidity the heat index was well over 100 degrees several days.

Organizingglass-bells

We stayed home most of the time since it was so hot and didn’t do much in the yard other than water a few plants. My husband put pictures on walls and I organized my craft room. It’s finally coming together which is nice.

I finally got my glass bells hung. I’ve had them for quite a while and some bells have gotten a bit broken during moves, but I still love them. They had gotten very tangled during the move and since I unpacked them I looked at them several times, but hadn’t taken the time to untangle them. I finally took that time. And it makes me happy!

Television & a movie

We watched some of the Republican Convention and will watch the Democratic Convention next week. We also watched a lot of the humorous political commentary which was some relief from some of the speakers at the Convention.

Friday we went to see the new Star Trek movie: “Star Trek Beyond”. We really enjoyed it. I like the new Star Trek movies.

The blog

I finally finished my book. The book was good and glad I finished it! Only a few posts. I hope to get a few posts done ahead since we have traveling scheduled for the next couple weeks!

Blog posts

My books

What I’m reading
  • The Brutal Telling by Louise Penny
What I read last week
  • No Good Dragon Goes Unpunished by Rachel Aaron
New–Books, E-books, NetGalley, Audiobooks–purchased or free or from library

Kilmoon: A County Clare Mystery by Lisa Alber

On the Head of a Pin: A Thaddeus Lewis Mystery by Janet Kellough

Address to Die For by Mary Feliz

The Gods Themselves by Isaac Assimov

Interesting on the internetNew-York-Society-Library

I found this article at the Mystery Fanfare Blog:

And it’s a fascinating article for all of us who love libraries. It would make a great novel–maybe a mystery or fantasy!

Life behind the stacks: The secret apartments of New York libraries (from 6sqft)

Free Sync Audio books

Sync is back again for the summer (May 5 – Aug 17). Sync is a program which provides two free young adult audiobook downloads each week. Each set of books are only available for one week.

Only 4 more weeks of Sync books!

The Sync books available this week (July 21 – 28):

The Sync books available next week (July 28 – August 4):

  • Pennies for Hitler by Jackie French; read by Humphrey Bower
  • Juba! by Walter Dean Myers; read by Brandon Myer

To listen to these books you must download Overdrive Media Console. It is available free to download at the Sync site.

Note: Some of the books have international restrictions, but some are available even if you live outside the U.S.

Next Week–home & blog

My husband and I are going to visit his dad for the week. We’re leaving Monday and coming home on Friday. I hope to read and do some blogging and commenting while I’m there. We’ll see. It won’t be quite as hot next week–in the eighties, I think.

Blog posts

  • Review
  • Waiting on Wednesday
  • Review
  • Sunday Post

What did you do last week? What books did you collect? What are you planning?

Waiting on Wednesday: July 20

I am participating in Waiting on Wednesday hosted by Breaking the Spine. This gives me a chance to show the books I’m looking forward to in the next few months.

Check out Breaking the Spine for more information.

………………………..

once-broken-faithOnce Broken Faith

by Seanan McGuire

Series: October Daye #10

Genre: Urban Fantasy

Publication date: September 6

Synopsis: Politics have never been October “Toby” Daye’s strong suit. When she traveled to the Kingdom of Silences to prevent them from going to war with her home, the Kingdom of the Mists, she wasn’t expecting to return with a cure for elf-shot and a whole new set of political headaches.

Now the events she unwittingly set in motion could change the balance of modern Faerie forever, and she has been ordered to appear before a historic convocation of monarchs, hosted by Queen Windermere in the Mists and overseen by the High King and Queen themselves.

Naturally, things have barely gotten underway when the first dead body shows up. As the only changeling in attendance, Toby is already the target of suspicion and hostility. Now she needs to find a killer before they can strike again—and with the doors locked to keep the guilty from escaping, no one is safe.

As danger draws ever closer to her allies and the people she loves best, Toby will have to race against time to prevent the total political destabilization of the West Coast and to get the convocation back on track…and if she fails, the cure for elf-shot may be buried forever, along with the victims she was too slow to save.

Because there are worse fates than sleeping for a hundred years.

…………………………

The reasons this book appeals to me:
  • This is a favorite series of mine.
  • I really like Toby and other characters in the series.
  • I’m a couple of books behind and want to catch up!

Books set outside the U.S.

Top Ten

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted at the Broke and the Bookish blog. Each week a different topic is introduced and it is fun to see what everyone writes each week. Check out their blog for more information.

The topic this week: talk about the books we’ve read set outside the United States.

As I looked for books I’ve read set outside the United States I realized most of the books come from just a few countries. Also a number of the books I read are science fiction and fantasy with imaginary settings.

I do have books which take place in other settings. I just haven’t read them yet!

Ireland

Murder in an Irish Village by Carlene O’Connor

Medieval Ireland, on Viking ships, Iceland

Hush: An Irish Princess’ Tale by Donna Jo Napoli

Canada

In the Shadow of the Glacier by Vicky Delany

A Rule Against Murder by Louise Penny (French Canada)

Scotland

Cold in the Earth by Aline Templeton

Raven Black by Ann Cleeves (Shetland Island)

Scotland, Belgium, Russia

The Firebird by Susanna Kearsley

England

Necessary as Blood by Deborah Crombie

Alaska Territory (1919)

Borrowed Death by Cathy Pegau

Australia

And All the Stars by Andrea K. Höst

What books set outside the United States do you recommend?

Sunday Post: July 17

Sunday-Post

 

This is a great meme to take part in every week and I thank Kimba for hosting it!

I like this meme because it gives me an opportunity to take a look back at last week and forward to next week in both my personal life and my blog and book life! I also like to see what other people are doing and what books everyone is reading.

Last week–home and blog

A busy week both at home and around town!

Waiting in line–hurry up and wait

We spent a whole day waiting at various government agencies getting drivers’ and vehicle licenses. We went to three different buildings miles apart after we waited 2 hours at the first place. I was exhausted when we got home.

We also got library cards for two communities close to us which means I can put books on hold there. That gives me more chances of finding the books I want. Or finding new books I didn’t know I wanted.

Putting things away

We spent a lot of time unpacking boxes–most of them pictures. We have lots of pictures and we want to unpack them all before we decide what to hang and where to hang it.

We also bought a new refrigerator which was delivered this week. The existing refrigerator was really old and though it worked there were parts of it not working. It seemed to always be running. We bought an Energy Smart refrigerator so our power company will give us a rebate. Taking everything out of the refrigerator and then putting it back in was a lot of work!

Television

We’ve watched a little television the last couple of weeks. Our favorites:

The Great British Baking Show on PBS. The new season started a couple weeks ago. This is my favorite reality cooking show. Knowledgeable judges, funny and sympathetic hosts and interesting British home bakers. Some of the things they have to bake I’ve never heard of and sometimes the bakers haven’t heard of them either!

We watched the final three or four episodes of last year’s Dark Matter to remember what happened. We’ve got some of the new season recorded and we’re ready to start watching. This science fiction show is one of our favorite shows from last year.

The blog

I got a few posts completed this week. Made me feel good! Not much reading completed though. I’m reading a good book, but couldn’t concentrate very long. I have so many good books I want to read. I want to get some reading done.

Blog posts

My books

What I’m reading
  • No Good Dragon Goes Unpunished by Rachel Aaron
  • The Brutal Telling by Louise Penny
What I read last week
  • Nothing
New–Books, E-books, NetGalley, Audiobooks–purchased or free or from library
  • No new books!

Interesting on the internet

Free Sync Audio books

Sync is back again for the summer (May 5 – Aug 17). Sync is a program which provides two free young adult audiobook downloads each week. Each set of books are only available for one week.

The Sync books available this week (July 14 – 21):

Only 5 more weeks of Sync books!

The Sync books available next week (July 21 – 28)

To listen to these books you must download Overdrive Media Console. It is available free to download at the Sync site.

Note: Some of the books have international restrictions, but some are available even if you live outside the U.S.

Next Week–home & blog

More of the same–putting things away or reorganizing so we have more places to put things. Thinking of recipes which won’t heat up the house since the forecast is for around 100 degrees several days next week. I have a few things planned for the blog.

Blog posts

  • Review: Borrowing Death by Cathy Pegau
  • Top Ten Tuesday
  • Waiting on Wednesday
  • Review
  • Sunday Post

What did you do last week? What books did you collect? What are you planning?

Missing, Presumed by Susie Steiner

missing-presumed-by-susie-steinerMissing, Presumed by Susie Steiner
Series: Unknown
Genre: Mystery
Setting: Cambridgeshire, England
Published by Random House
Format: e-Arc (Release Date: June 28)
–I received a review copy of this book from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. The opinions stated here are entirely my own.
368 pages
Grade: C+
Synopsis: At thirty-nine, Manon Bradshaw is a devoted and respected member of the Cambridgeshire police force, and though she loves her job, what she longs for is a personal life. Single and distant from her family, she wants a husband and children of her own. One night, after yet another disastrous Internet date, she turns on her police radio to help herself fall asleep—and receives an alert that sends her to a puzzling crime scene.

Edith Hind—a beautiful graduate student at Cambridge University and daughter of the surgeon to the Royal Family—has been reported missing for nearly twenty-four hours. Her home offers few clues: a smattering of blood in the kitchen, her keys and phone left behind, the front door ajar but showing no signs of forced entry. Manon instantly knows this case will be big—and that every second is crucial to finding Edith alive.

The investigation starts with Edith’s loved ones: her attentive boyfriend, her reserved best friend, and her patrician parents. As the search widens and press coverage reaches a frenzied pitch, secrets begin to emerge about Edith’s tangled love life and her erratic behavior leading up to her disappearance. With no clear leads, Manon summons every last bit of her skill and intuition to close the case, and what she discovers will have shocking consequences not just for Edith’s family, but for Manon herself.

Suspenseful and keenly observed, Missing, Presumed is a brilliantly twisting novel of how we seek connection, grant forgiveness, and reveal the truth about who we are.

Initial impressions

  • Interesting, but not exactly the book I thought it was going to be. I thought it was more police procedural. Ended up more thriller and psychological.

The story

  • Edith Hind is missing. A small amount of blood is found in her house. Her door is unlocked, cell phone, car and personal items are left behind.
  • When her boyfriend returns from a weekend away and finds her gone, he notifies her parents and the police.
  • A huge search finds no sign of Edith alive or dead.
  • As the hours, days and weeks go by and the police find no real clues to her disappearance the police believe she must be dead.
  • Where is Edith and is she alive or dead?

Pluses

  • I don’t really enjoy thrillers or psychological mysteries which this book is more than it is a police procedural.
  • The book is told in a mix of present and past tense and from many points of view. Detective Sergeant Manon Bradshaw is probably the main character, but we find out about the story from many others, too. At the beginning of each chapter the present tense aspect and switch in point-of-view jarred, but after a couple of paragraphs I got used to it. I think the author shows quite a bit of skill to write the book this way.
  • I found the story suspenseful and quite well-written.
  • It is more character study than mystery.
  • I don’t like Manon very well–which isn’t necessary for a book–though I like to connect with characters.
  • My favorite character is Davy, Manon’s partner. I like the way he views the world and how he see’s Manon. Though he certainly has his blind spots.

Minuses

  • Manon is a mess during much of the book. She’s 39 years old, but she hasn’t learned some of the basics of working in a team in the workplace, let alone as a detective sergeant in the police force. And her personal life is a mess. She does some stupid things both professionally and personally.
  • I thought the end of the book ties up all the strings in this book much too easily. And I’m offended by one of the characters at the end of the book.

And concluding thoughts . . .

  • This isn’t really the type of mystery I enjoy. I think that’s at least part of the reason I didn’t like the book as much as other readers.
  • I did find parts of it interesting and suspenseful. However, this is not quite my chosen genre.

Have you read this book? How did you like it?

Author info

  • Susie Steiner grew up in north London and studied English at York University, which is when she first fell in love with north Yorkshire, in particular the north York Moors national park, which was the setting for her first novel, Homecoming. Homecoming was published by Faber & Faber to critical acclaim in 2013.
  • She worked for national papers as a news reporter. She left reporting when her first novel sold.
  • Her second novel, Missing, Presumed, is a bestselling thriller with Detective Sergeant Manon Bradshaw at its heart. Missing, Presumed is based in Cambridgeshire. She worked closely with Cambridgeshire police during the writing of this and the next Manon book.
  • She lives with her husband and two sons in north London.

Reading Challenges

The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman

the-invisible-library-by-genevieve-cogmanThe Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
Series: The Invisible Library #1
Genre: Fantasy
Setting: Inside the Library and in alternate worlds
Published by Roc
Format: e-Arc (Release Date: June 14)
–I received a review copy of this book from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. The opinions stated here are entirely my own.
352 pages
Grade: B
Synopsis: One thing any Librarian will tell you: the truth is much stranger than fiction…

Irene is a professional spy for the mysterious Library, a shadowy organization that collects important works of fiction from all of the different realities. Most recently, she and her enigmatic assistant Kai have been sent to an alternative London. Their mission: Retrieve a particularly dangerous book. The problem: By the time they arrive, it’s already been stolen.

London’s underground factions are prepared to fight to the death to find the tome before Irene and Kai do, a problem compounded by the fact that this world is chaos-infested—the laws of nature bent to allow supernatural creatures and unpredictable magic to run rampant. To make matters worse, Kai is hiding something—secrets that could be just as volatile as the chaos-filled world itself.

Now Irene is caught in a puzzling web of deadly danger, conflicting clues, and sinister secret societies. And failure is not an option—because it isn’t just Irene’s reputation at stake, it’s the nature of reality itself…

Initial impressions

  • So many things caught my attention about this book–the Library aspect, the adventure of finding books and bringing them back to the Library. I enjoyed the book–with a few caveats!

The story

  • Book begins with Irene in an alternate world stealing a book for the shadowy Library. She gets away and back to the Library, but not before she is chased to the portal to the Library.
  • She reports in and immediately receives a new assignment. And she is assigned a student to mentor. She had hoped for some down time in the Library, but she heads off into the Library to meet Kai, the student she must take with her and mentor.
  • When she meets Kai he is rather mysterious. Their assignment is to an alternate London which is chaos-infested. Irene is puzzled that she is being sent there with a student.
  • In a chaos world reality is changed enough to allow supernatural beings and magic. This makes the world unpredictable and dangerous.
  • On their way to the portal for the alternate world they are intercepted by another spy who wants Irene to hand over her assignment. Irene has a history with this spy and doesn’t trust her.
  • Irene and Kai enter the alternate London, meet their colleague stationed in this world who briefs them about the world and start trying to retrieve the book.
  • They immediately run into problems which escalate–mostly because of the chaos in this world.
  • Irene tries to figure out exactly what Kai is hiding as well as trying to unravel the mystery of where the stolen book is. Can she trust Kai?
  • She receives an urgent message that a dangerous renegade Librarian is present in this alternate London.
  • Irene and Kai must unravel the mysteries, decide who to trust and survive to get the book back to the Library.

Pluses

  • The chaos world Irene and Kai are sent to is interesting. I think there is lots more to learn about it in future books.
  • The ability to move through many worlds is very exciting to read about.
  • Reading about a huge invisible library is very awesome!
  • I enjoyed learning more about Irene and Kai during the book. Each of them have vulnerabilities, but lots of strength of character, too.
  • Lots of chaotic things happen during the book both because of the world they are in, the characters they meet in that world and the renegade from the Library who infiltrates the world.
  • There’s a steampunk vibe to the world Kai and Irene are in which I enjoy.
  • There’s mystery to the story and even a detective from the world they’re in whom they join forces with.
  • Kai is still mysterious by the end of the book and I look forward to getting to know more about him.
  • I want to learn more about the Library. I have a feeling the motives of the Library and some of the people working there may not be as pure as Irene thinks.

Minuses

  • This read more like a young adult book, but it doesn’t seem like it should be YA since Irene has lived quite a while already. Irene doesn’t seem as self-confident and experienced as I would expect and Kai acts like a teenager. I’m not sure the romance vibe between them works.
  • I feel like this first book throws lots of concepts and setup of the worlds at the reader which we will understand better as we read more books. This made things kind of confusing, but after a bit I just went with the flow!

And concluding thoughts . . .

  •  The next book in this series–The Masked City–comes out in the United States in September!
  • I want to find out what happens next!

Have you read this book? How did you like it?

Author info

  • Genevieve Cogman got started on Tolkien and Sherlock Holmes at an early age, and has never looked back. But on a perhaps more prosaic note, she has an MSC in Statistics with Medical Applications and has wielded this in an assortment of jobs: clinical coder, data analyst and classifications specialist. Although The Invisible Library is her debut novel, she has also previously worked as a freelance roleplaying game writer. Genevieve Cogman’s hobbies include patchwork, beading, knitting and gaming, and she lives in the north of England.

Reading Challenges

Waiting on Wednesday: July 13

I am participating in Waiting on Wednesday hosted by Breaking the Spine. This gives me a chance to show books that will be published in the next few months which I’m looking forward to reading.

Check out Breaking the Spine for more information.

………………………..

etched-in-boneEtched in Bone

by Anne Bishop

Series: The Others #5

Genre: Urban Fantasy

Publication date: March 7

Synopsis: After a human uprising was brutally put down by the Elders—a primitive and lethal form of the Others—the few cities left under human control are far-flung. And the people within them now know to fear the no-man’s-land beyond their borders—and the darkness…

As some communities struggle to rebuild, Lakeside Courtyard has emerged relatively unscathed, though Simon Wolfgard, its wolf shifter leader, and blood prophet Meg Corbyn must work with the human pack to maintain the fragile peace. But all their efforts are threatened when Lieutenant Montgomery’s shady brother arrives, looking for a free ride and easy pickings.

With the humans on guard against one of their own, tensions rise, drawing the attention of the Elders, who are curious about the effect such an insignificant predator can have on a pack. But Meg knows the dangers, for she has seen in the cards how it will all end—with her standing beside a grave.

…………………………

The reasons this book appeals to me:
  • The Others series is one of my favorites.
  • Anne Bishop is one of my favorite authors. I’ve read many of her books through the years.
  • I’m looking forward to what happens next with Meg and the Lakeside Courtyard.