All-time favorite authors

toptentuesday2

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted at the Broke and the Bookish blog. Each week a different topic is introduced and it is fun to see what everyone writes each week.Check out their blog for more information.

This week I’m choosing my ten all-time favorite authors–a very difficult task!

I limited my authors to:

  • I’ve read more than one of their books
  • I’ve read their books for longer than 10 years
  • Influential in the kind of books I read

The authors who influence my science fiction and fantasy reading

All authors I read as a young adult; my love for science fiction and fantasy is because of them:

1. Madeline L’EngleA Wrinkle in Time is the favorite book I’ve read by Ms. L’Engle. I loved reading about the Murry family in A Wrinkle in Time and I read more books about the Murry family and the Austin family after that. I love the way she wrote about families. And I’ve read some of her adult books–especially The Crosswick Journals.

2. Andre Norton–I read lots of her books when I was a teenager–especially the Witch World series and the Time Trader series.

3. Robert Heinlein–I read all of Robert Heinlein’s juveniles as a teenager as well as most of his other books through the years (e.g., Stranger in a Strange Land and The Moon is a Harsh Mistress).

4. Anne McCaffrey–I love the Pern books which I also read as a young adult. They might be the first books about dragons I read. They fueled my imagination!

The mystery author influences

I also read lots of mysteries as a young adult. These authors dominated that mystery reading.

5. Agatha Christie–I’ve read nearly all the Agatha Christie books. The Hercule Poirot books are my favorites.

6. Dick Francis–a former steeplechase jockey turned mystery author. I read his books as a teenager and for years afterward.

7. Tony Hillerman–wrote mysteries about the Navajo Indians which feature Lt. Joe Leaphorn and/or Sgt. Jim Chee of the Navajo Tribal Police.Β  I love the mysteries and reading about the Navajo Indians and the Southwest.

Urban fantasy authors

When authors started writing urban fantasy I was on board and I’ve read lots of them in the last 15+ years, but these are the two authors I love and always come back to.

8. Patricia Briggs–I started reading Patricia Briggs’ books before she started her Mercy Thompson books. The first books I read by Ms. Briggs were fantasy beginning with Dragon Bones. I really liked the fantasy books, but I knew Patricia Briggs was an author I’d read for years after I read Moon Called, the first Mercy Thompson book.

9. Ilona Andrews–They’ve only been publishing the Kate Daniels books since 2008 so they don’t quite fit my 10 years of reading, but I’ve read more than 10 books by them and love them all.

Romance author

I spent several years reading romance nonstop and very few fantasy, science fiction or mysteries. Now it’s the opposite–I’m reading very little romance, but Mary Balogh is still the romance author I’ll read both her new books and her older books.

10. Mary Balogh–my favorite romance author and the one I keep buying and reading today.

Who are your favorite authors?

Author: Jan

I love to read--especially mysteries, science fiction and fantasy. I also love blogging, photography, gardening, playing Mah Jonng, reading with a cat on my lap, throwing a ball for a dog, creating cards to send to family and friends, reading book blogs, using my computer.

16 thoughts on “All-time favorite authors”

  1. Mary Balogh was almost on my list as well. I love her books! Her Simply… series is still one of my favorites and there are so many of hers that I’ve yet to read. Ilona Andrews is an author I’m really wanting to try. I’ve heard such great things about her! Great list!

    Like

  2. I’ve read every author on your list, wowza! Though, it’s been many years since I read Norton and I only read one or two. πŸ™‚ L’Engle is a fave of mine but she didn’t quite make the cut off for my list. I love your list. ❀

    Like

  3. I like how you categorized your authors, that was a good idea. I’ve read quite a few of these, although they didn’t make my list. I’ve just gotten into the Christie books; I think when I first read them I was too young and thought I didn’t like them, but 30 years later I love them. Have you tried Georgette Heyer’s mysteries? Written during the Christie era they are excellent and funny, too. She also wrote romance, so be aware of what you are selecting.

    Like

    1. Thanks, Elizabeth! I’ve read a number of Georgette Heyer romances through the years, but haven’t read any of her mysteries. I’ll have to try some. Thanks for the tip!

      Like

  4. I love how you added the factor of influencing your reading. When I think about it, most of my TTT authors would meet that criterion as well. And although there’s not a lot of crossover on our lists (L’Engle and McCaffrey are the only two, I think), a bunch of your others came close to making my list. Heinlein, certainly, and Christie, and Dick Francis, and Mary Balogh. I loved Norton as a child and teen but find that I don’t re-read her much now, which knocked her out of the running for me. As for Briggs and Andrews, they keep moving higher up the “must try this author” list, based in part on your love for them!

    Like

    1. When I thought about favorite authors I have so many I love, but it is the authors who’ve influenced my future reading that I ultimately decided to use. A number of the authors you chose also almost made my list! I don’t read Andre Norton anymore either, but so many of her books are still ones I think of (though I may not remember the name of the specific book…lol). I do hope you’ll try Briggs and Andrews one of these days. I know how it is though with so many great books to read, Lark.

      Like

  5. I sadly didn’t love A Wrinkle in Time, maybe I should give it a shot on audiobook and see if that helps me love it more
    New follower πŸ™‚
    Missie

    Like

    1. A Wrinkle in Time is definitely a middle grade book. I think, Missie. And that’s when I read it. As an adult I re-read it when I read it to my kids. That was a great way to revisit it. The audiobook version might be worth a good way to try it if the narrator is good. But there are some books which others love which just don’t work for us. So don’t worry about it if you don’t love it!

      Like

Comments are closed.