Sunday Post: June 29

rp_sundaypostmeme13.jpgThe Sunday Post is a meme hosted by Kimba at Caffeinated Book Reviewer.

I like this meme because it gives me an opportunity to take a look back at last week and forward to next week in both my personal life and my blog and book life! I also like to see what other people are doing and what books everyone is reading. This is a great meme to take part in every week and I thank Kimba for hosting it!

 

Last Week

 

Home & blog

We watched several World Cup games this week including the U.S. game. Met our son again to watch the Brazil v. Chile game on Saturday. His girlfriend came with him this time since she has a couple of weeks break in her classes. Good to see both of them and it was a fun game.

This month I’ve started a number of books, but not finished all of them. This week I finally got through them all! I’ve also got a backlog of reviews so this week I posted four reviews. A record for me, I think…LOL. I also updated my Book Review Index to add the titles of the books into the index. I’m not sure how I like that. Maybe I should have two separate indexes–one sorted by titles and one sorted by author??!

Blog posts

Books

What I’m reading

The Golden City by J. Kathleen Cheney

What I read this week

Stolen Songbird by Danielle L. Jensen

These Old Shades by Georgette Heyer

Splintered by A. G. Howard (audiobook)

Fuzzy Nation by John Scalzi

E-books bought (or free)

Pardonable Lies by Jacqueline Winspear

Suddenly Last Summer by Sarah Morgan

Elantris by Brandon Sanderson

Audiobooks

Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick

October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shephard by Lesléa Newman

Around the internet

  • Sync downloads

Sync is a site for young adult audiobooks. In the summer (beginning May 15 to August 20) they offer two free audiobooks each week.

June 26 – July 2
FORGIVE ME, LEONARD PEACOCK by Matthew Quick, Narrated by Noah Galvin (Hachette Audio)
OCTOBER MOURNING: A Song for Matthew Shepard by Lesléa Newman, Narrated by Emily Beresford, Luke Daniels, Tom Parks, Nick Podehl, Kate Rudd, Christina Traister (Brilliance Audio)

July 3 – July 9
TORN FROM TROY by Patrick Bowman, Narrated by Gerard Doyle (Post Hypnotic Press)
PETER AND THE STARCATCHERS by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson, Narrated by Jim Dale (Brilliance Audio)

Check out the entire Sync schedule.

Next Week

Home & blog

A busy week next week. I’ve got lots of appointments the first part of the week and then since Friday (July 4) is Independence Day here in the U.S. we’re taking a long weekend to visit my husband’s father in Iowa. Lots of fun, but lots to do before we leave!

Posts

  • July books on my radar. . .
  • Review: Three Weeks With Lady X by  Eloisa James
  • Review: The Emperor’s Soul by Brandon Sanderson
  • Review:
  • Sunday Post

What books did you collect last week? What are you planning next week?

Review: Heaven’s Queen by Rachel Bach

Heaven's Queen
Heaven’s Queen

 

Heaven’s Queen
by Rachel Bach
Series: Paradox, Book 3
Genre: Science Fiction, Space Opera
Published by Orbit, 2014
E-book, Purchased
373 pages
Grade: B+
Synopsis: From the moment she took a job on Captain Caldswell’s doomed ship, Devi Morris’ life has been one disaster after another: government conspiracies, two alien races out for her blood, an incurable virus that’s eating her alive.

Now, with the captain missing and everyone — even her own government — determined to hunt her down, things are going from bad to impossible. The sensible plan would be to hide and wait for things to blow over, but Devi’s never been one to shy from a fight, and she’s getting mighty sick of running.

It’s time to put this crisis on her terms and do what she knows is right. But with all human life hanging on her actions, the price of taking a stand might be more than she can pay.

“The tools of evolution are time and death, Deviana. The second greatest illusion is that of our own importance. Our lives are not sacred; the universe does not care about little specks. We in our hubris care, and when we try to fight the universe, we will always lose, because we are finite, and the finite can never defeat the infinite….”

. . .

I growled deep in my throat. I was past fed up with this guru bullshit.

Cheers

  • The trilogy published all in six months! I got to read the books quickly which increased my enjoyment.
  • I grew to like this trilogy more and more as I read the books.
  • Devi is a great character–funny, violent, idealistic, a little naive sometimes, loyal, never giving up.
  • Lots of action.
  • I would like to read more about this world Ms. Bach created–especially about Paradox.
  • Ms. Bach does a good job wrapping up all the threads in the books. That doesn’t always happens in a trilogy or series.

Jeers

  • No jeers!

And a few thoughts. . .

  • This is a fun set of books–space opera science fiction with lots of action making them quick reads. It’s great to have a rollicking space adventure.

Have you read this book? How did you like it?

Reading Challenges

I’m participating in the Book Bingo Challenge (new release square).

Review: The Immortal Rules by Julie Kagawa

The Immortal Rules
The Immortal Rules

 

 

The Immortal Rules
by Julie Kagawa
Series: Blood of Eden, Book 1
Genre: Young Adult Fantasy (dystopia)
Published by Harlequin Teen, 2012
E-book, Purchased
485 pages
Grade: C
Synopsis: Allison Sekemoto survives in the Fringe, the outermost circle of a walled-in city. By day, she and her crew scavenge for food. By night, any one of them could be eaten. Some days, all that drives Allie is her hatred of them—the vampires who keep humans as blood cattle. Until the night Allie herself dies and becomes one of the monsters.

Forced to flee her city, Allie must pass for human as she joins a ragged group of pilgrims seeking a legend—a place that might have a cure for the disease that killed off most of civilization and created the rabids, the bloodthirsty creatures who threaten human and vampire alike. And soon Allie will have to decide what and who is worth dying for… again.

“…Sometime in your life, Alison Sekemoto, you will kill a human being. Accidentally or as a conscious, deliberate act. It is unavoidable. The question is not if it will happen, but when.”

Cheers

  • I like Allie. She fights for everything she has. She realizes how important education is and tries to teach others to read. She treasures her books and her memories of her mother who taught her to read and read to her.
  • The vampires keeping humans as cattle is realistic.

Jeers

  • Much of the book is depressing…which probably is the definition of dystopia, but I still didn’t enjoy that.
  • The book doesn’t offer much new about vampires.

Thoughts

  • This book reminds me a little of The Coldest Girl in Coldtown by Holly Black. I like Ms. Black’s book better.
  • This book also reminds me of some dystopian TV shows from the last couple years. There was one (I can’t remember the name) where the character traveled throughout the countryside after a worldwide power outage caused the breakdown of governments. The main characters were looking for something and there were bands of roving outlaws (I only watched a few episodes). The Immortal Rules also has some of these elements. Allie travels around the country, too. It gets tiresome!
  • I like Julie Kagawa’s Iron Fey series better.

Have you read this book? How did you like it?

I’m participating in the following reading challenges for this book:

  • The Book Bingo Challenge.

Review: Earth Girl by Janet Edwards

Earth Girl
Earth Girl

 

Earth Girl
by Janet Edwards
Series: Earth Girl, Book 1
Genre: Young Adult Science Fiction
Published by Harper Voyager, 2012
E-book, Purchased
358 pages
Grade: B+
Synopsis: A sensational YA science fiction debut from an exciting new British author. Jarra is stuck on Earth while the rest of humanity portals around the universe. But can she prove to the norms that she’s more than just an Earth Girl?

2788. Only the handicapped live on Earth. While everyone else portals between worlds, 18-year-old Jarra is among the one in a thousand people born with an immune system that cannot survive on other planets. Sent to Earth at birth to save her life, she has been abandoned by her parents. She can’t travel to other worlds, but she can watch their vids, and she knows all the jokes they make. She’s an ‘ape’, a ‘throwback’, but this is one ape girl who won’t give in.

Jarra invents a fake background for herself – as a normal child of Military parents – and joins a class of norms that is on Earth to excavate the ruins of the old cities. When an ancient skyscraper collapses, burying another research team, Jarra’s role in their rescue puts her in the spotlight. No hiding at back of class now. To make life more complicated, she finds herself falling in love with one of her classmates – a norm from another planet. Somehow, she has to keep the deception going.

The twentieth century is the one they summarize as war, war and bore.

and

This wasn’t just about what the norms thought of apes, it was also about how I thought about myself, and . . .

Cheers

  • The book takes place on the Earth over 700 years in the future. I can’t think of any science fiction books I’ve read with a setting that far in the future.
  • Janet Edwards creates such an interesting world. This is a great debut book!
  • The book deals with discrimination. Humans who’ve left Earth call those left on Earth “Handicapped” if they’re polite; if not, they’re called “Apes.” They’re often considered sub-human by off-worlders. Earthlings use “Norms” (polite) or “Exos” (impolite) for the people who leave Earth.
  • Jarra grows and changes throughout the book. She begins with a lot of anger toward her real parents and off-world people. What happens to her in the course of the book changes her world view.
  • The concept of an underpopulated Earth is interesting. Most everyone who could leave Earth leaves during “Exodus” and the cities fall into disrepair. Jarra loves pre-history–the history before most everyone left Earth. Much of the book takes place on an archaeology dig in New York City.
  • The archaeology in this book is fascinating. The author does a good job describing the dangers as well as Jarra’s obsession with the history of the cities and mankind.
  • Jarra is funny and irreverent. She’s serious about pre-history and the dig sites. She’s outwardly very self-confident, but inwardly often unsure of herself. She manages to pass herself off as a normal child of military parents so well even fools her professor.
  • Lots of action! I read the book quickly since so much is going on.
  • The class of norms Jarra joins is full of interesting students. I enjoy learning about them and the sectors of Space inhabited by humans. Each sector–Alpha, Beta, Delta, Epsilon, Gamma, Kappa–has developed with different customs.

Jeers

  • I don’t understand the one in a thousand with an immune system that can’t survive anywhere except Earth. However, I’m willing to take this on faith and not worry too much since I like the book so much.

Thoughts

  • I first heard about Earth Girl from a review of the second book (Earth Star) at Anya’s blog On Starships & Dragon Wings. It’s one of the best I’ve read all year! I’ve already read the second book–Earth Star–and want the third book now. The concluding book in the trilogy Earth Flight  comes out in August 2014.

Have you read this book? How did you like it?

I’m participating in the following reading challenges for this book:

  • The 2014 New Author Reading Challenge hosted at the Literary Escapism blog.
  • The Book Bingo Challenge.

Review: And All the Stars by Andrea K. Höst

and-all-the-stars

 

And All the Stars
by Andrea K. Höst
Series: None
Genre: YA Science Fiction (post apocalyptic/dystopia)
Published by Andrea K. Höst, 2012
E-book, Purchased
204 pages
Grade: B
Synopsis: Come for the apocalypse. Stay for cupcakes. Die for love. Madeleine Cost is working to become the youngest person ever to win the Archibald Prize for portraiture. Her elusive cousin Tyler is the perfect subject: androgynous, beautiful, and famous. All she needs to do is pin him down for the sittings. None of her plans factored in the Spires: featureless, impossible, spearing into the hearts of cities across the world – and spraying clouds of sparkling dust into the wind. Is it an alien invasion? Germ warfare? They are questions everyone on Earth would like answered, but Madeleine has a more immediate problem. At Ground Zero of the Sydney Spire, beneath the collapsed ruin of St James Station, she must make it to the surface before she can hope to find out if the world is ending.

 “…any more than we can be certain of surviving two years, or two days. I can’t speak to what-ifs, but I know I will always be glad to have been here in this moment with you.”

and

Fight. Always fight. No matter how impossible the odds, no matter who you’ve lost, how you’ve been hurt. If there doesn’t seem to be a way out, look for one. If you seem to have come to an end, start afresh. Never, give up.”

Cheers

  • Very original.
  • I love the tagline: Come for the apocalypse. Stay for cupcakes. Die for love.
  • This book is different from other  books by Ms. Höst. I think I say that every time I review one of her books! That’s one of the things I enjoy about her writing and why she’s one of my favorite authors.
  • The book begins with a bang. The first sentence caught my attention immediately: “Madeleine Cost’s world was a tight, close space, a triangular tube tilted so her head lay lower than her feet.”
  • Black towers erupt in cities all over the world. Dust spews out by the towers. It’s not clear what’s happening.
  • Surprises me in many places. I wasn’t sure the direction the book was going. There are so many places which surprised me. And I didn’t know how it would end.
  • Madeleine is a strong character. She has to figure things on her own at first and even after she finds other people in her situation and becomes part of a group she still is a strong character throughout the book.
  • The relationships in the book are great. I enjoy the friendships and romantic relationships.
  • Humanity responds to the mystery of the spires and the crisis of people infected in typical ways–mostly in their own self-interest.

Jeers

  • I like this book, but maybe because it’s young adult I think some problems get solved too easily. Even as I state (see above) humanity acts in expected ways, I think there would be more problems with the spires in the cities around the world and I think the end is a little too easy.

Thoughts

  • Andrea K. Höst has rapidly become of my favorite authors. I like every book of hers I’ve read so far and as I stated above each book is very different.
  • However, I don’t like this book as well as others I’ve read by Ms. Höst. I think that’s because it’s a young adult book. The Touchstone series also by Andrea K. Höst is probably classified as young adult, but it didn’t seem YA to me.  I read a few young adult books and have found many I like a lot–and I like this book, just not as much as others by this author.

Reading Challenges

Have you read this book? How did you like it?

I’m participating in the following reading challenges for this book:

Sunday Post–June 22

rp_sundaypostmeme13.jpg

The Sunday Post is a meme hosted by Kimba at Caffeinated Book Reviewer.

I like this meme because it gives me an opportunity to take a look back at last week and forward to next week in both my personal life and my blog and book life! I also like to see what other people are doing and what books everyone is reading. This is a great meme to take part in every week and I thank Kimba for hosting it!

 

Last Week

 

Around the house

Hot and humid much of the week. I stayed inside as much as possible.

Blog posts

Books

What I’m reading

Stolen Songbird by Danielle L. Jensen

These Old Shades by Georgette Heyer

Splintered by A. G. Howard (audiobook)

What I read this week

Earth Star by Janet Edwards

The Spanish Consultant by Sarah Morgan

E-books bought (or free)

The Golden City by J. Kathleen Cheney

The Fierce Reads Anthology by Anna Banks, Leigh Bardugo, Jennifer Bosworth, Emma Laybourne & Marissa Meyer (free)

The Apple Orchard by Susan Wiggs

Earth Star by Janet Edwards

Midsummer Night” by Deanna Raybourne (novella)

Orleans by Sherri L. Smith

The Thousand Names by Django Wexler

Learning to Swim by Sara J. Henry

Audiobooks

Pontoon by Garrison Keillor

The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett

Without a Summer by Mary Ronette Kowal

Break In by Dick Francis

I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have to Kill You by Ally Carter

Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery

Dance of the Gods by Nora Roberts (library)

Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed (library)

Around the internet

  • Sync downloads

Sync is a site for young adult audiobooks. In the summer (beginning May 15 to August 20) they offer two free audiobooks each week.

June 19 – June 25

I’D TELL YOU I LOVE YOU, BUT THEN I’D HAVE TO KILL YOU by Ally Carter, Narrated by Renée Raudman (Brilliance Audio)
ANNE OF GREEN GABLES by L.M. Montgomery, Narrated by Colleen Winton (Post Hypnotic Press)

June 26 – July 2
FORGIVE ME, LEONARD PEACOCK by Matthew Quick, Narrated by Noah Galvin (Hachette Audio)
OCTOBER MOURNING: A Song for Matthew Shepard by Lesléa Newman, Narrated by Emily Beresford, Luke Daniels, Tom Parks, Nick Podehl, Kate Rudd, Christina Traister (Brilliance Audio)

Check out the entire Sync schedule.

Started yesterday, June 21–the Summer Solstice (in the northern hemisphere). Read and review books and participate in weekly activities. Hosted by Fantasy is More Fun & Because Reading is Better Than Real Life…Check it out!

Next Week

House & blog

I hope to read and blog more this next week. I want to participate in some of the COYER activities. I’m also working on some ideas to add a thing or two to my blog.

Posts

  • Review: And All the Stars by Andrea K. Höst
  • Review: The Immortal Rules by Julie Kagawa
  • Review:
  • Sunday Post

What books did you collect last week? What are you planning next week?

Review: White Night by Jim Butcher

White Night
White Night

 

White Night
by Jim Butcher
Series: The Dresden Files, Book 9
Genre: Urban Fantasy
Published by Roc, 2007
E-book, Purchased
416 pages
Grade: B+
Synopsis: In Chicago, someone has been killing practitioners of magic, those incapable of becoming full-fledged wizards. Shockingly, all the evidence points to Harry Dresden’s half-brother, Thomas, as the murderer. Determined to clear his sibling’s name, Harry uncovers a conspiracy within the White Council of Wizards that threatens not only him, but his nearest and dearest, too…

 

…and at some point you realize that there are more flavors of pain than coffee. There’s the little empty pain of leaving something behind ‒ graduating, taking the next step forward, walking out of something familiar and safe into the unknown. There’s the big, whirling pain of life upending all of your plans and expectations. There’s the sharp little pains of failure, and the more obscure aches of successes that didn’t give you what you thought they would. There are the vicious, stabbing pains of hopes being torn up. The sweet little pains of finding others, giving them your love, and taking joy in their life as they grow and learn. There’s the steady pain of empathy that you shrug off so you can stand beside a wounded friend and help them bear their burdens.

And if you are very, very lucky, there are a few blazing hot little pains you feel when you realize that you are standing in a moment of utter perfection, an instant of triumph, or happiness, or mirth which at the same time cannot possibly last ‒ and yet will remain with you for life.

Everyone is down on pain, because they forget something important about it: Pain is for the living. Only the dead don’t feel it.

Cheers

  • I enjoy this series a lot. Harry is a great character and I enjoy all the different characters which populate this world.
  • I like how Harry thinks about things–his ironic wit, his cynical look at the world he lives in, his open-eyed courage as he walks into danger.
  • This isn’t the book to read first if you’ve never read this series before. In the earlier books it isn’t necessary to start with book 1, but I think you should start with one of the first five and then maybe go back and read some of those first books (that’s what I did, BTW.)
  • I’ve read and reviewed this series more than any series since I started my blog a little over a year ago. (I’ve read more by other authors, but not since I started my blog).

Concerns

  • The last book brings up the possibility of a white council conspiracy. It’s mentioned in this book, but not much happens on that front.

Conclusions

  • In less than a year I’ve read eight books in this series. I enjoy each book which is a complete story, but I also like the overall story arc which begins practically with the first book–the war between the red vampires and the white council and maybe a conspiracy within the white council.
  • I’m always ready to begin the next books, but I try to space them out a little so I don’t run out of books too quickly!

Have you read this book? How did you like it?

This book is eligible for the following reading challenge:

  • The Book Bingo Challenge.

TBR Review: When Beauty Tamed the Beast by Eloisa James

This is my TBR review for the month of April hosted by Wendy @ The Misadventures of Super Librarian. The review for this challenge posts on the third Wednesday each month.

The challenge this month: Romance Classics (classic book, classic author, classic trope/theme etc.) I chose a Beauty and the Beast trope.

when-beauty-tamed-the-beast

When Beauty Tamed the Beast
by Eloisa James
Series: Fairy Tales, Book 2
Genre: Historical Romance
Published by Avon, 2011
E-book, Purchased
372 pages
Grade: B+
Synopsis: Miss Linnet Berry Thrynne is a Beauty . . . Naturally, she’s betrothed to a Beast.

Piers Yelverton, Earl of Marchant, lives in a castle in Wales where, it is rumored, his bad temper flays everyone he crosses. And rumor also has it that a wound has left the earl immune to the charms of any woman.

Linnet is not just any woman.

She is more than merely lovely: her wit and charm brought a prince to his knees. She estimates the earl will fall madly in love—in just two weeks.

Yet Linnet has no idea of the danger posed to her own heart by a man who may never love her in return.

If she decides to be very wicked indeed . . . what price will she pay for taming his wild heart?

“I do believe that his given name is something odd. Peregrine, Penrose- Piers, that’s it.”
“He sounds like a dock.” Lord Sundron put in.
“Mrs. Hutchins called me a light frigate this morning,” Linnet said “a dock might be just the thing for me.”

and

“I didn’t realize you needed a response. When Hamlet is giving a monologue, he just goes on and on by himself.”

Likes

  • A delightful book. I love the back-and-forth between Piers and Linnet. It is so much fun to read.
  • The way Linnet is ruined is very funny. Linnet shows her humor and self-deprecation in the first chapter as she faces the reality of her position.
  • Piers is a character modeled on “House” from the doctor in the TV series by that name.
  • I like the way Ms. James uses the Beauty and the Beast theme.
  • Piers has good reasons for not talking to his father since he and his mother left him.
  • Linnet is cynical about her beauty and the response of people around her.
  • I like the last third of the book which turns Linnet’s beauty against her.
  • Piers is fiercely intelligent and a doctor even though he’s a lord. His injured leg is often painful, he gets irritated with the people around him and he doesn’t bother with kindness to his patients.
  • Linnet is also very intelligent, but many people never see that. They just see her beauty. Piers sees beyond her beauty and recognizes her intelligence and a kindred spirit in her cynicism. He values these things far more than her beauty.
  • Linnet make changes to the way Piers treats the patients and Piers finally lets her. Linnet sees the patients as people; Piers sees them as cases. Both ways are important to the patients.
  • Piers’ mother and father are great characters, too.

Dislikes

  • Piers says terrible things to Linnet to drive her away.

Thoughts

  • I like Eloisa James’ writing a lot. This book is a good example with the witty exchanges between characters. I’ve read several of these fairy tale remakes by Eloisa James and like them. She makes these fairy tales fresh and fun to read.

Have you read this book? How did you like it?

As well as the TBR reading challenge hosted by Wendy I’m also participating in the following reading challenges for this book:

My summer reading list

toptentuesday2The Broke and the Bookish blog hosts Top Ten Tuesday.

The books I’m excited about reading this summer–a mix of books published this summer and books I already own and want to read–more than just ten!

New Books

Suddenly Last Summer by Sarah Morgan (June 24)

  • I read the first book (Sleigh Bells in the Snow) in this series around Christmas last year. Sarah Morgan is a favorite author of mine.magicbreaks

Bloodshifted by Cassie Alexander (July 1)

  • I finished the last book (Deadshifted) in this series about a month ago and am looking forward to this book since the last book ended in a cliffhanger.

The Escape by Mary Balogh (July 1)

  • Mary Balogh is an auto-buy author and I’m enjoying this historical romance series.

The Suffragette Scandal by Courtney Milan (July 14)

  • Courtney Milan is another historical romance author I like a lot. Her books are very well written.

Magic Breaks by Ilona Andrews (Aug 5)

  • The Kate Daniels series is one of my very favorite series and this is my most anticipated book of the summer!

My TBR Books

Earth Star by Janet Edwards

  • I loved the first book (Earth Girl) in this series.medair

Sweet Disorder by Rose Lerner

  • I bought this book when it came out in March, but still haven’t read it. 😦  Rose Lerner is also a favorite historical romance author.

Medair by Andrea K. Höst

  • I’m loving Andrea K. Höst’s writing and I’ve had this book (actually two books–The Silence of Medair and Voice of the Lost) for a while so I hope to read it this summer.

Crown of Midnight by Sarah J. Maas

  • I really like the first book in this series so I need to get busy and read this one!

Cruel Beauty by Rosamund Hodge (audiobook)

  • I’ve had this audiobook for a long time and have heard lots of great things about it.

Extras

the-apple-orchardThe Apple Orchard by Susan Wiggs (Library e-book)–if the library book comes in this summer

  • I love the cover of this book–it sure looks like summer! I have it on hold and hope I’ll get it sometime this summer.

River Road by Jayne Ann Krentz (Library e-book)–if the library book comes in this summer

  • This book came out in January and I’ve wanted to read it. I finally found it at my library so again I’ve got it on hold.

Harlequin books–light reads for summer

  • I enjoy reading Harlequin books sometimes. They’re great books for summer reading and I’ve found some good authors.

 

What books are you excited to read this summer?

Sunday Post–June 15

rp_sundaypostmeme13.jpg

 

The Sunday Post is a meme hosted by Kimba at Caffeinated Book Reviewer.

I like this meme because it gives me an opportunity to take a look back at last week and forward to next week in both my personal life and my blog and book life! I also like to see what other people are doing and what books everyone is reading. This is a great meme to take part in every week and I thank Kimba for hosting it!

Happy Father’s Day to all the fathers out there!

Last Week

 

Around the house

We’ve had thunderstorms and rain several times this week. It was also very humid, but just in time for the weekend the temperatures and humidity dropped some! Yay! I’ve stopped taking anything for my allergies. Nothing seems to work so I’d rather not feel drugged. Some days are better than others!

My husband and I went into DC, met our son at an Irish soccer pub and watched the Italy v. England World Cup game on Saturday evening. I hoped England would win, but my son was happy when Italy won! We managed to find some pretty good seats at the bar by arriving an hour early! The bar was very crowded, but we had fun and was good to see our son.

Blog posts

Books

What I’m reading

Stolen Songbird by Danielle L. Jensen

These Old Shades by Georgette Heyer

Splintered by A. G. Howard (audiobook)

When Beauty Tamed the Beast by Eloisa James

What I read this week

Earth Girl by Janet Edwards

The Midwife’s Child by Sarah Morgan

E-books bought (or free)

Jaran by Kate Elliott

A Passage of Stars by Kate Elliott

Among Thieves by Douglas Hulick

Me: Stories of My Life by Katharine Hepburn

The Midwife’s Child by Sarah Morgan

Of Poseidon by Anna Banks

“The Lady Astronaut of Mars” by Mary Robinette Kowal

“The Water That Falls on You From Nowhere” by John Chu

“Wakulla Springs” by Andy Duncan

“The Ink Readers of Doi Saket” by Thomas Olde Heuvelt

Audiobooks

Short Stories by C. S. Lewis

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

The Hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom

Around the internet

  • Sync downloads

Sync is a site for young adult audiobooks. In the summer (beginning May 15 to August 20) they offer two free audiobooks each week.

Available from June 12-18:

CODE NAME VERITY by Elizabeth Wein, Narrated by Morven Christie and Lucy Gaskell (Bolinda Audio)
THE HIDING PLACE by Corrie Ten Boom, John Sherrill, Elizabeth Sherrill, Narrated by Bernadette Dunne (christianaudio)

June 19 – June 25
I’D TELL YOU I LOVE YOU, BUT THEN I’D HAVE TO KILL YOU by Ally Carter, Narrated by Renée Raudman (Brilliance Audio)
ANNE OF GREEN GABLES by L.M. Montgomery, Narrated by Colleen Winton (Post Hypnotic Press)

Check out the entire Sync schedule.

  •  Get Tor.com’s Original Fiction Hugo Finalists for Free

These books are also on Amazon for free so I would guess they’re free on other locations, too.

Best Novella:

“Wakulla Springs” by Andy Duncan and Ellen Klages

“Equoid” by Charles Stross

Best Novellate:

“The Last Astronaut of Mars” by Mary Robinette Kowal

Best Short Story:

“The Ink Readers of Doi Saket” by Thomas Olde Heuvelt

“The Water That Falls on You From Nowhere” by John Chu

Next Week

Around the house

Summer is here…next week the temps should be in the 90’s several days! Also summer officially arrives on the 21st!

Posts on the blog

  • Top Ten Tuesday–My Summer Reading
  • TBR Review: Splintered by A. G. Howard
  • Review: And All the Stars by Andrea K. Höst
  • Review: The Immortal Rules by Julie Kagawa
  • Sunday Post

What books did you collect last week? What are you planning next week?